0208 764 1254 info@nphc.co.uk

Norbury News

1 week ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Last week we had litter mates Larry and Myrtle in for their first vaccinations,they were very brave (as you can see from Myrtle's photo hehe) Kittens need two injections as part of their course with 3-4 week break between them then a yearly booster. ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

She was far more chilled after the event!

2 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

There are a number of products these days to help keep your pets teeth clean.
solutions you can put into their drinking water to help with bad breath and sore gums.
Pet specific tooth pastes, some which you do not need to actually use a brush, as they create a protective barrier on the teeth so food is less likely to get stuck in them. (NEVER use human toothpaste, Most human toothpastes include fluoride, which is extremely poisonous to our pets)

If you would like to talk to us about these products feel free to come by the surgery or give us a call on 0208 764 1254 😁👍
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The beautiful Emma was in on Monday to have her teeth scaled and polished.
Isn't she stunning!! and now she has minty fresh breath to go with her good looks hehe 😍
She came in for her post operative check today and she is doing very well.
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The beautiful Emma was in on Monday to have her teeth scaled and polished.
 Isnt she stunning!! and now she has minty fresh breath to go with her good looks hehe 😍
She came in for her post operative check today and she is doing very well.

HYPERTENSION IN CATS
Hypertension, or high blood pressure usually occurs in cats as a result of another underlying disease, such as kidney disease, heart disease or hyperthyroidism.

What are the signs?
Over time, hypertension can cause damage to major organs. The organs most vulnerable to the effects of high blood pressure are the eyes, kidneys, heart and brain.
Signs include:
-Blindness
-Changes in the eye, including bleeding,
-disorientation,
-seizures.

If the hypertension is related to another condition, signs relating to this disease will also be present.

Diagnosis:
A thorough clinical exam performed by your vet can sometimes identify the signs of hypertension. However, it is often difficult to diagnose without further tests being performed at the surgery. We can also measure your cats blood pressure using a cuff device applied to the leg or even around the tail.

Treatment and diet:
If possible, your cat should be treated for any underlying conditions first. If successful, this alone may resolve the hypertension. However, due to the possible severe consequences of high blood pressure, it may be necessary to start medication immediately.

The most common treatment for hypertension is oral drugs and there are several available, including liquid forms.

It is important to visit your vets for follow-up checks so that your cat’s blood pressure can be regularly monitored and any necessary adjustments can be made.

It is often advised to feed a cat that has been diagnosed with hypertension a low salt diet, avoiding ‘treats’ or any other food which may contain additional sodium, such as tuna in brine.

Many cats go on to live relatively normal lives following diagnosis and stabilisation of hypertension, but this will depend on the type and severity of any underlying disease.

Remember, the sooner it is detected and corrected, then the greater the chance of preventing more severe permanent damage to your pet’s health.

(Dear little Masie was presented with sudden onset apparent blindness. We measured her Blood Pressure and found it to be high and started her on medication immediately. She was the perfect patient at her follow up Blood Pressure check as you can see from the picture hehe )
... See MoreSee Less

HYPERTENSION IN CATS
Hypertension, or high blood pressure usually occurs in cats as a result of another underlying disease, such as kidney disease, heart disease or hyperthyroidism.
 
What are the signs?
Over time, hypertension can cause damage to major organs.  The organs most vulnerable to the effects of high blood pressure are the eyes, kidneys, heart and brain.
Signs include:
-Blindness
-Changes in the eye, including bleeding,
-disorientation,
-seizures.
 
If the hypertension is related to another condition, signs relating to this disease will also be present.
 
Diagnosis:
A thorough clinical exam performed by your vet can sometimes identify the signs of hypertension.  However, it is often difficult to diagnose without further tests being performed at the surgery.  We can also measure your cats blood pressure using a cuff device applied to the leg or even around the tail.
 
Treatment and diet:
If possible, your cat should be treated for any underlying conditions first.  If successful, this alone may resolve the hypertension.  However, due to the possible severe consequences of high blood pressure, it may be necessary to start medication immediately. 

The most common treatment for hypertension is oral drugs and there are several available, including liquid forms.
 
It is important to visit your vets for follow-up checks so that your cat’s blood pressure can be regularly monitored and any necessary adjustments can be made.
 
It is often advised to feed a cat that has been diagnosed with hypertension a low salt diet, avoiding ‘treats’ or any other food which may contain additional sodium, such as tuna in brine.
 
Many cats go on to live relatively normal lives following diagnosis and stabilisation of hypertension, but this will depend on the type and severity of any underlying disease.
 
Remember, the sooner it is detected and corrected, then the greater the chance of preventing more severe permanent damage to your pet’s health.

(Dear little Masie was presented with sudden onset apparent blindness. We measured her Blood Pressure and found it to be high and started her on medication immediately. She was the perfect patient at her follow up Blood Pressure check as you can see from the picture hehe )

2 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Its been bitterly cold recently and we must stay vigilant with our pets safety.
Most anti freeze products are toxic to cats and dogs, so be careful what we use ourselves and be sure to wash down your dogs paws after their walks!
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Its been bitterly cold recently and we must stay vigilant with our pets safety. 
Most anti freeze products are toxic to cats and dogs, so be careful what we use ourselves and be sure to wash down your dogs paws after their walks!Image attachmentImage attachment

2 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

That's about rite! haha! ... See MoreSee Less

Thats about rite! haha!

 

Comment on Facebook

Irini Kellaris

3 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Any one else feeling like this in the cold! BRRRRrrrrrrrr!!!

MetDaan Animals
How I react when someone is trying to wake me up😹
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Comment on Facebook

when I see this, I'm always aware of other things https://www.facebook.com/IvhVeterinary/photos/basw.AbpxUUSISdb5dMiBBiM_wgZUUg9fyP8vNZLLLM1RRARipUCwnKFzQpslLbSjrZtf_o0jI1URWvgRK5TPiuYlRbYXSp99Llyl267brOzax6c5iKC2Wp6DK6s0yrFFnw2eS08DwlawzGkAveFcmpxvbX-Nj_umvB0CkEzBkoFV_nsJtQ.1674714592801619.1651803478397483.1067248040074473.878109975556602.898691480188260.1939446959690788.10205531274508242.917781828258845.10155992679800065/1067248040074473/?type=1&theater

Maxine Wilby

3 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

During the whole of February you can bring your pet in for a FREE dental checked with the Vet.

We are also offering 20 Percent off of Dental procedures when booked during the Dental Promotion month.
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During the whole of February you can bring your pet in for a FREE dental checked with the Vet. 

We are also offering 20 Percent off of Dental procedures when booked during the Dental Promotion month.Image attachmentImage attachment

4 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

How lovely!
Its always great to be involved with an owner being reunited with their beloved fur babies.

Animal Planet
We're so happy this boy and this cat are reunited! 😻 #animaltales
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Comment on Facebook

This boy has such a good heart <3 So happy to see him reunited with his precious kitty.

1 month ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Devastating news, such beautiful and gentle creatures.

Pretty 52
Following the news that giraffe's have recently been put under the 'critically endangered' status, it's a breath of fresh air to see these three calves happily playing at a safari park in the UK ❤️️🙏
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T: 0208 764 1254

A: 1203A London Road
Norbury
London
SW16 4UY

E: info@nphc.co.uk

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