0208 764 1254 info@nphc.co.uk

Norbury News

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Comment on Facebook

Awwe adorable...you all have a peaceful weekend too. X

Are these puppies with you now if so I'm on my way!!! X

Are these for sale?

2 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Re post, Please be in touch if you think you have seen this little one.

Thank you all xPLEASE SHARE and help this little one find his way home.
Thank you everyone👏🏻💪🏼
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Re post, Please be in touch if you think you have seen this little one. 

Thank you all x

Comment on Facebook

Shared Norbury too x

Shared Norbury

PLEASE SHARE and help this little one find his way home.
Thank you everyone👏🏻💪🏼
... See MoreSee Less

PLEASE SHARE and help this little one find his way home. 
Thank you everyone👏🏻💪🏼

Comment on Facebook

Shared

missing what area?

Hello, we are reaching out to a lady who came by the surgery last night when we were closed and spoke to the vet 😎
If this was you PLEASE can you call the surgery on 02087641254 😁😁👍👍😁😁 Thank you!!
Lovely clients if you could share this post it would be very helpful 🤩
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Comment on Facebook

Shared Norbury

Shared

Shared

Hahaha what do all of your door bells look like? Post a picture in the comments😁😂 ... See MoreSee Less

Hahaha what do all of your door bells look like? Post a picture in the comments😁😂

PANCREATITIS IN DOGS AND CATS:

Pancreatitis literally means inflammation of the pancreas, is a fairly common condition that we encounter at Norbury Pet Health Centre in dogs and cats, and is broadly divided in to acute and chronic types and if not treated can potentially be life-threatening.
The pancreas is an organ that lies near the stomach, small intestine and liver, and plays a role in the digestion of food as well as maintaining glucose levels in the body via the secretion of Insulin.

CLINICAL SIGNS:

Owners often notice that their pet has a reduced appetite, is lethargic and may have vomiting or diarrhoea, as well as be showing signs of pain and dehydration. Classically dogs may adopt the so called “praying position” where they stretch down on their front legs, with their body extended in order to make themselves more comfortable.
Less common signs such as jaundice may be seen, where the eyes, gums and skin may appear varying degrees of yellow.
In cats the signs may be similar but are often more subtle, where the cat may simply be quieter, not themselves, hiding away more and possibly eating less.

CAUSES:

Certain breeds seem genetically predisposed to pancreatitis – in dogs, Miniature Schnauzers, English Cocker Spaniels and Boxers are amongst those with a higher incidence, and in cats the Siamese are over-represented.
Dietary indiscretion is a common factor in dogs, often after scavenging something, eating a fatty meal, or simply having a different food to normal.
Other possible causes include trauma, infections, pharmaceutical drugs that a pet may be on, cancer, and hormonal conditions such as hypothyroidism in dogs, (basically an underactive thyroid).
In cats pancreatitis is commonly associated with other medical conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cholangiohepatitis and diabetes.

DIAGNOSIS:

This is usually based on clinical signs, blood tests, ultrasound and x-rays of the abdomen, and for a definitive diagnosis, surgical biopsies, although these are rarely done for most cases, and a diagnosis is presumed based on a blood test called Pancreatic specific lipase. At Norbury Pet Health Centre we regularly run these tests which gives us a positive or negative result, although it must be advised that a positive result can be secondary to other factors such as intestinal disease/diarrhoea.
Any underlying risk factors should also be identified and addressed.

TREATMENT:

This is based largely on supportive treatment with intravenous fluids, controlling the clinical signs with pain relief, anti-vomiting medications and antacids. In cases that are responding less well we may use steroids or even antibiotics, although there is little evidence to suggest that these are indicated in most case.
In dogs an ultra-low fat diet seems essential to control it, and minimise the risk of flare ups, whilst in cats this seems less essential, but we still recommend a moderately low fat diet.
It was thought for years that “starving” the pancreas by withholding food for a period of time was an important part of treatment, but evidence now points to improved prognosis with early nutritional support, provided the vomiting is under control.
In very mild cases hospitalisation may not be required, but more often than not it is highly recommended and may be essential to achieve the best outcomes. If the condition is not treated promptly then it can be potentially life-threatening.
Commonly however, pancreatitis will recur, and so life-long management of the disease through appropriate diet, adjunctive treatments as necessary, and the identification of possible risk factors or underlying causes is essential.
... See MoreSee Less

PANCREATITIS IN DOGS AND CATS:

Pancreatitis literally means inflammation of the pancreas, is a fairly common condition that we encounter at Norbury Pet Health Centre in dogs and cats, and is broadly divided in to acute and chronic types and if not treated can potentially be life-threatening. 
The pancreas is an organ that lies near the stomach, small intestine and liver, and plays a role in the digestion of food as well as maintaining glucose levels in the body via the secretion of Insulin. 

CLINICAL SIGNS: 

Owners often notice that their pet has a reduced appetite, is lethargic and may have vomiting or diarrhoea, as well as be showing signs of pain and dehydration. Classically dogs may adopt the so called “praying position” where they stretch down on their front legs, with their body extended in order to make themselves more comfortable. 
Less common signs such as jaundice may be seen, where the eyes, gums and skin may appear varying degrees of yellow. 
In cats the signs may be similar but are often more subtle, where the cat may simply be quieter, not themselves, hiding away more and possibly eating less. 

CAUSES: 

Certain breeds seem genetically predisposed to pancreatitis – in dogs, Miniature Schnauzers, English Cocker Spaniels and Boxers are amongst those with a higher incidence, and in cats the Siamese are over-represented. 
Dietary indiscretion is a common factor in dogs, often after scavenging something, eating a fatty meal, or simply having a different food to normal.
Other possible causes include trauma,  infections,  pharmaceutical drugs that a pet may be on, cancer, and  hormonal conditions such as hypothyroidism in dogs, (basically an underactive thyroid).
In cats pancreatitis is commonly associated with other medical conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cholangiohepatitis and diabetes. 

DIAGNOSIS: 

This is usually based on clinical signs, blood tests, ultrasound and x-rays of the abdomen, and  for a definitive diagnosis, surgical biopsies, although these are rarely done for most cases, and a diagnosis is presumed based on a blood test called Pancreatic specific lipase. At Norbury Pet Health Centre we regularly run these tests which gives us a positive or negative result, although it must be advised that a positive result can be secondary to other factors such as intestinal disease/diarrhoea. 
Any underlying risk factors should also be identified and addressed. 

TREATMENT: 

This is based largely on supportive treatment with intravenous fluids,  controlling the clinical signs with pain relief, anti-vomiting medications and antacids. In cases that are responding less well we may use steroids or even antibiotics, although there is little evidence to suggest that these are indicated in most case. 
In dogs an ultra-low fat diet seems essential to control it, and minimise the risk of flare ups, whilst in cats this seems less essential, but we still recommend a moderately low fat diet. 
It was thought for years that “starving” the pancreas by withholding food for a period of time was an important part of treatment, but evidence now points to improved prognosis with early nutritional support, provided the vomiting is under control. 
In very mild cases hospitalisation may not be required, but more often than not it is highly recommended and may be essential to achieve the best outcomes. If the condition is not treated promptly then it can be potentially life-threatening.
Commonly however, pancreatitis will recur, and so life-long management of the disease through appropriate diet, adjunctive treatments as necessary,  and the identification of possible risk factors or underlying causes is essential.Image attachment

Rabbit Awareness week is in full swing!
Book an appointment today and receive 10% off of the health check and a FREE Rabbit Goody bag, but do hurry we only have limited supplies 🐰
... See MoreSee Less

Rabbit Awareness week is in full swing! 
Book an appointment today and receive 10% off of the health check and a FREE Rabbit Goody bag, but do hurry we only have limited supplies 🐰

2 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Help! I am lost, I am safe and being kept at a local veterinary practice but it is not home 🙁
If you recognise me or know my owner and that I am missing please call the surgery on 0208 764 1254.

Thank you.
... See MoreSee Less

Help! I am lost, I am safe and being kept at a local veterinary practice but it is not home :(
If you recognise me or know my owner and that I am missing please call the surgery on 0208 764 1254. 

Thank you.

Comment on Facebook

Gorgeous little one xxxx

Beautiful little puss 😸

I hope he gets reunited with his owners. I suspect he has escaped.

Wow. This beautiful little thing was not chipped...?😞💕

What a gorgeous kitten. Hope the owner is found soon.

What a beauty! Hope you get home soon xxx

Hope owner is found🙏🐈

I've shared I hope the owner found soon

If owner not found, adopted parents available. X so beautiful.

Wow what a lil beauty, shared x

Could be my junior? Missing since Christmas. Are they a boy or a girl? X

Awwww soo cute xx

This looks very much like my cat that has been missing- is it a boy? Has it been scanned?

I think he is from near Harcourt Road. I remember seeing a cat like this a lot.

Looks very much like boris. Been missing since 12/2018 😞

Up up

Shared

Shared Only Found Cats uk and IRL. Bengal/cross cats lost and found

Mandy Wiles will Home it if owner not found xx

Rachel Smith ... I know it’s a long way from you but ... ?

Missing 11 days ago from Munster Road Fulham but could have got in delivery van? www.petsreunited.com/fulham/hammersmith-and-fulham/lost/cats/lost-male-bengal-cat/i1fqxq1c

I’d love to give him a home my Millie needs a friend hope you find his hoe

Karen Jordan yours has white on its face....looks a bit different....

View more comments

June is National Microchip Month.

You can get your pet Micro-chipped at Norbury Pet Health Centre for just £15!

Back in April 2016 it was made the law to have your dog micro chipped, so don't delay if your dogs still isnt.

Call the surgery on 0208 764 1254 to book an appointment.
... See MoreSee Less

June is National Microchip Month. 

You can get your pet Micro-chipped at Norbury Pet Health Centre for just £15! 

Back in April 2016 it was made the law to have your dog micro chipped, so dont delay if your dogs still isnt.

Call the surgery on 0208 764 1254 to book an appointment.
🤣

Comment on Facebook

Tried to call Prince in once, while I fed the birds, He??? well he stayed on shed amongst bird seed 😀

Is anybody else actually putting a tune to this as well? 😂😂😂

Contact Us

T: 0208 764 1254

A: 1203A London Road
Norbury
London
SW16 4UY

E: info@nphc.co.uk

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