0208 764 1254 info@nphc.co.uk

Norbury News

Ear mites facebook post...

Ear mites are mites that live in the ears of animals and humans. The most commonly seen species in Veterinary medicine is Otodectes Cynotis (Gk. Oto=ear, dectes=biter, cynotis=of the dog).
They are barely visible to the human eye and they may be tolerated without clinical signs in some animals, particularly cats.
An infestation produces brownish ear wax, similar in appearance to coffee grounds.
(CUPPA ANYONE)?

Typical points relating to ear mite infection are:

• It can occur in any age group, although is more common in puppies and kittens.
• It occurs in both cats and dogs, although more commonly in cats.
• Infection may affect one or both ears
• In dogs, infection is more commonly associated with itchy and a red, inflamed ear canal.
• Ear mites are transmitted through social interactions between pets
• Ear mites are not generally considered a risk to humans
• Ear mites, once diagnosed can be successfully treated with a number of medications
• Because ear mites are contagious, all pets in the household (both dogs and cats) should be treated for ear mites.
Your Vet can provide assistance in choosing the most effective treatment for your pets.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PARASITE CONTROL FOR YOUR PET, PLEASE CALL THE SURGERY ON 020 8764 1254
... See MoreSee Less

Ear mites facebook post...

Ear mites are mites that live in the ears of animals and humans.  The most commonly seen species in Veterinary medicine is Otodectes Cynotis (Gk. Oto=ear, dectes=biter, cynotis=of the dog).
They are barely visible to the human eye and they may be tolerated without clinical signs in some animals, particularly cats.
An infestation produces brownish ear wax, similar in appearance to coffee grounds.  
(CUPPA ANYONE)?

Typical points relating to ear mite infection are:

• It can occur in any age group, although is more common in puppies and kittens.
• It occurs in both cats and dogs, although more commonly in cats.
• Infection may affect one or both ears
• In dogs, infection is more commonly associated with itchy and a red, inflamed ear canal.
• Ear mites are transmitted through social interactions between pets
• Ear mites are not generally considered a risk to humans
• Ear mites, once diagnosed can be successfully treated with a number of medications
• Because ear mites are contagious, all pets in the household (both dogs and cats) should be treated for ear mites.
Your Vet can provide assistance in choosing the most effective treatment for your pets.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PARASITE CONTROL FOR YOUR PET, PLEASE CALL THE SURGERY ON 020 8764 1254Image attachmentImage attachment

3 days ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Remember everyone to be extra careful over the Easter break with any chocolate treats that we may have in the house, or Easter Egg hunts in the garden!
Our 4 legged friends love the stuff but it does not love them back!Never hurts to give this reminder. There is no antidote to theobromine that is found in Chocolate....always keep it out of reach.
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Remember everyone to be extra careful over the Easter break with any chocolate treats that we may have in the house, or Easter Egg hunts in the garden!
Our 4 legged friends love the stuff but it does not love them back!

Happy Weekend everyone!!
From all of us here at Norbury and the stunning Chelsea who was in visiting us last week.
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Happy Weekend everyone!! 
 From all of us here at Norbury and the stunning Chelsea who was in visiting us last week.

Hello Everyone!

Just a little reminder of our opening times over the Easter bank holiday.

We will be closed Friday 19th April and Monday 22nd April.
We will be open Saturday 20th normal hours of 9am-1pm.

If you need your pet to be seen urgently when we are closed please call Streathams South London Emergency clinic on 020 8677 0976.

PS. If you are running low on any medication or prescription food then make sure you get yours orders in before Wednesday 17th April to be sure you receive them before the break otherwise you will have to wait until Tuesday 23rd for them to arrive 👍
... See MoreSee Less

Hello Everyone! 

Just a little reminder of our opening times over the Easter bank holiday. 

We will be closed Friday 19th April and Monday 22nd April. 
We will be open Saturday 20th normal hours of 9am-1pm. 

If you need your pet to be seen urgently when we are closed please call Streathams South London Emergency clinic on 020 8677 0976.

PS. If you are running low on any medication or prescription food then make sure you get yours orders in before Wednesday 17th April to be sure you receive them before the break otherwise you will have to wait until Tuesday 23rd for them to arrive 👍

LEECH USES IN THE TREATMENT OF AURAL HAEMATOMAS.

Leeches have been used in human and Veterinary medicine for centuries, and in recent times have enjoyed a revival in both fields.

We use Leeches primarily in the treatment of aural haematomas in small animals. Aural haematomas are basically a collection of blood and fluid within all or part of the ear flap, usually caused by an ear infection, either primarily, or secondary to allergies, whereby constant scratching and shaking of the head causes trauma to the ear and results in blood vessels bursting inside the ear flap.
Some times the bleeding covers the entire ear and can be under tension, and quite painful, other times only a small part of the ear flap is affected.

Traditionally the best way to treat this condition has been surgically, where the blood/swelling is drained under general anaesthetic, and for example, sutures are placed in the ear to prevent recurrence, and provide the best cosmetic result. The underlying cause also must be treated if applicable.
Unfortunately this technique requires a full anaesthetic, is more invasive to the dog or cat, and is more costly, though probably achieves the best results.
The simplest technique we use is to drain the fluid from the ear flap directly with a needle in the consulting room, but whilst this is usually well tolerated the swelling invariably recurs, so it has very little merit.

Where an anaesthetic is not ideal, either due to the age of the animal, owner concerns, or due to the cost, we are increasingly using leech therapy- this is much less invasive and costly than surgery, and is done on a conscious animal, usually only takes a short period of time, and can some times produce as good a result, though it usually works better on a fresher haematoma, and some times the procedure may need to be repeated. The other advantage is that pre-starving is not usually required due to no anaesthetic being necessary.

Leeches have a set of three jaws, each containing about a hundred teeth which create a neat cut when they attach to the affected area, whilst injecting a local anaesthetic type substance, so the process is relatively pain free. As they feed on the blood they also release various substances which promote bleeding which lasts for some time after the procedure, and reduces blood clotting, so makes the recurrence of the haematoma much less likely.

At Norbury Health Pet Centre we recently saw Ella, a French Bulldog with an aural haematoma in her left ear, almost certainly secondary to an ongoing allergy issue that she has. All the treatment options were discussed with the owner, and initially conservative management was chosen as the haematoma was a fairly mild one. The swelling was drained and a steroid injection was placed into the haematoma, but unfortunately as warned, it reoccurred and actually became more extensive, so further treatment was required.
The owner had concerns about putting Ella under an anaesthetic and so leech treatment was chosen as the most appropriate option.

Ella was admitted in the morning, and several leeches were placed on the inside of her left ear flap and left in situ until they detached themselves. Overall they stayed on for around 15-20 minutes each, Ella tolerated this well, and was soon returned home to her owner none the worse for wear, other than some mild, ongoing bleeding, which is part of the healing process, and to be expected.
We will be closely monitoring Ella's response to the leech treatment to see if a further therapy is required, but hope that this will not be necessary.

I hope that some of the attached pictures do not make any one too squeamish, but am happy to answer any questions if you have any.
... See MoreSee Less

LEECH USES IN THE TREATMENT OF AURAL HAEMATOMAS.

Leeches have been used in human and  Veterinary medicine for centuries, and in recent times have enjoyed a revival in both fields. 

We use Leeches primarily in the treatment of aural haematomas in small animals. Aural haematomas are basically a collection of blood and fluid within all or part of the ear flap, usually caused by an ear infection, either primarily, or secondary to allergies, whereby constant scratching and shaking of the head causes trauma to the ear and results in blood vessels bursting inside the ear flap. 
Some times the bleeding covers the entire ear and can be under tension, and quite painful, other times only a small part of the ear flap is affected.

Traditionally the best way to treat this condition has been surgically, where the blood/swelling is drained under general anaesthetic,  and  for example, sutures are placed in the ear to prevent recurrence, and provide the best cosmetic result. The underlying cause also must be treated if applicable. 
Unfortunately this technique requires a full anaesthetic, is more invasive to the  dog or cat, and is more costly, though probably achieves the best results. 
The simplest technique we use is to drain the fluid from the ear flap directly with a needle in the consulting room, but whilst this is usually well tolerated the swelling invariably recurs, so it has very little merit. 

Where an anaesthetic is not ideal, either due to the age of the animal, owner concerns, or due to the cost, we are increasingly using leech therapy- this is much less invasive and costly than surgery, and is done on a conscious animal, usually only takes a short period of time, and can some times produce as good a result, though it usually works better on a fresher haematoma, and some times the procedure may need to be repeated. The other advantage is that pre-starving is not usually required due to no anaesthetic being necessary.

Leeches have a set of three jaws, each containing about a hundred teeth which create a neat cut when they attach to the affected area, whilst injecting a local anaesthetic type substance, so the process is relatively pain free. As they feed on the blood they also release various substances which promote bleeding which lasts for some time after the procedure, and reduces blood clotting, so makes the recurrence of the haematoma much less likely.

At Norbury Health Pet Centre we recently saw Ella, a French Bulldog with an aural haematoma in her left ear, almost certainly secondary to an ongoing allergy issue that she has.  All the treatment options were discussed with the owner, and initially conservative management was chosen as the haematoma was a fairly mild one. The swelling was drained and a steroid injection was placed into the haematoma, but unfortunately as warned, it reoccurred and actually became more extensive, so further treatment was required. 
The owner had concerns about putting Ella under an anaesthetic and so leech treatment was chosen as the most appropriate option.

Ella was admitted in the morning,  and several leeches were placed on the inside of her left ear flap and left in situ until they detached themselves.  Overall they stayed on for around 15-20 minutes each, Ella tolerated this well, and was soon returned home to her owner none the worse for wear, other than some mild, ongoing bleeding, which is part of the healing process, and to be expected. 
We will be closely monitoring Ellas response to the leech treatment to see if a further therapy is required, but hope that this will not be necessary. 

I hope that some of the attached pictures do not make any one too squeamish, but am happy to answer any questions if you have any.Image attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Fab! Have read about this condition and know if a few goldens who have had the operative procedure after it’s re occurred but have never read of any been offered leech treatment...well done NPHC, look forward to hearing long term outcome 🤞

What a great idea

I would recognise that ear anywhere 😂💕

I would recognise that ear anywhere 😂💕

1 week ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Always! haha😸 ... See MoreSee Less

Always! haha

 

Comment on Facebook

Oh yes know a puddy cat like that 😂

Vaccinations, What and Why?

What vaccinations can my cat have?

Feline Panleukopenia (also called Feline distemper or Feline Infectious Enteritis)
Before the development of a safe vaccine, Feline Panleukopenia was one of the biggest causes of death in cats. It is particularly dangerous for kittens and young cats, when severe vomiting and diarrhoea can cause fatal dehydration within 2-3 days of symptoms starting. The virus is spread in infected faeces and it can survive for long periods in the environment.

Cat Flu (also called Feline viral rhinotracheitis, caused by Feline calicivirus and herpesvirus)
Nearly all cases of respiratory disease in cats are caused by one of two viruses; herpesvirus and calicivirus. Cat flu is only rarely fatal except in very young or old cats and those who have a underlying condition. The effects are the same as in human flu – sneezing, a runny nose and eyes – but mouth ulcers may also occur. Once infected a cat may carry the virus for a long time and pose a risk to any unvaccinated cat it meets. Cats carrying the virus may not have any symptoms or may have mouth ulcers or ‘snotty noses’ which never get better. The protection given by vaccination may be short-lived and sometimes your cat may need to be vaccinated at six-month intervals.

Feline Leukaemia (FeLV)
Feline Leukaemia is probably the most important viral disease in cats. Not all cats that are infected with the virus get the disease. But, in those that do, it is almost always fatal and treatment can only prolong the cat’s life. The disease destroys the cat’s defences against other diseases and may cause fatal cancers. The virus is spread by direct contact with other cats so any cat that goes outside or mixes with other cats is at risk. If your cat is diagnosed with Feline Leukaemia it is recommended that they become house cats now as to prevent spreading the disease any further.

Chlamydia
Chlamydia is a disease which causes painful inflammation (conjunctivitis), ulcers and discharge from the eyes. It may cause infertility in some female cats. Young kittens with the disease may have sore or runny eyes from a few weeks old. It is mainly a problem where a large number of cats live together and once a cattery is affected, the disease often keeps coming back. Cats living on their own are at low risk of catching the disease. The disease can be treated with a long course of antibiotics.

What vaccinations are there for my dog?

Canine Distemper (Hard pad)
Canine Distemper is a serious disease of dogs caused by a virus. Affected dogs are often very ill and many die from the disease. Symptoms include coughing, a snotty nose, vomiting, diarrhoea and convulsions. Animals which recover may have ongoing illnesses for the rest of their lives. The vaccine is very effective and if given every 2-3 years will produce full protection against the disease.
Canine Infectious Hepatitis (adenovirus 1)
Canine infectious hepatitis is a disease caused by a virus which attacks the liver and can cause liver failure. Many animals who succumb to this disease will die. Less severely affected dogs may have a cough and a high temperature and may also develop a white layer on the front of the eye. There is no specific treatment for the disease but vaccination gives good protection.

Canine Parvovirus (Parvo)
Canine parvovirus is a virus which causes severe vomiting and diarrhoea, usually in young puppies. Many puppies affected by the disease will die. The disease is often less severe in older dogs but if bitches are infected while they are pregnant the puppies may be born with deformities.

Leptospirosis (Weil’s disease)
Leptospirosis is an infection caused by a bacterium. The disease is usually spread by rats which pass the bacteria out in their urine. The bacteria only survive well in moist conditions outside the rat, so dogs which spend a lot of time I water are most at risk. The disease is very serious and can cause jaundice and liver failure and can be spread to people as well as infecting dogs. Vaccination gives very good protection and usually lasts for a year (although dogs at high risk may need to be vaccinated more often).

Kennel Cough (infectious tracheobronchitis)
Kennel cough is not a serious disease in most otherwise healthy dogs. However, it is very infectious and will rapidly spread around the dog population. As its name suggests, it causes coughing which can go on for a month in some cases. Good kennels will insist that your dog is vaccinated against the disease before agreeing to take them for boarding. Kennel cough is caused by a combination of viruses and bacteria including: Canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus 2 and Bordetella.

WHY

Why vaccinate my dog?
Vaccinations can help protect your dog against some potentially fatal diseases, such as parvovirus, canine distemper, leptospirosis and infectious canine hepatitis.
Vaccinating your dog also stops them from catching and spreading deadly diseases to other dogs. Vaccinated dogs are less likely to catch diseases and won’t spread them around – meaning the whole of the dog population is also a little safer!

Why vaccinate my cat?

Cat vaccinations help to protect your pets from severe infectious diseases such as Feline Leukaemia, Feline viral rhinotracheitis and Feline Chlamydia. It also prevents them from passing anything nasty on to other cats in the area.

If you would like to discuss vaccinations with us please feel free to call us at the surgery on 02087641254. 👍🐱🐶💉
... See MoreSee Less

Vaccinations, What and Why? 

What vaccinations can my cat have?

Feline Panleukopenia (also called Feline distemper or Feline Infectious Enteritis)
Before the development of a safe vaccine, Feline Panleukopenia was one of the biggest causes of death in cats.  It is particularly dangerous for kittens and young cats, when severe vomiting and diarrhoea can cause fatal dehydration within 2-3 days of symptoms starting.  The virus is spread in infected faeces and it can survive for long periods in the environment.

Cat Flu (also called Feline viral rhinotracheitis, caused by Feline calicivirus and herpesvirus)
Nearly all cases of respiratory disease in cats are caused by one of two viruses; herpesvirus and calicivirus.  Cat flu is only rarely fatal except in very young or old cats and those who have a underlying condition. The effects are the same as in human flu – sneezing, a runny nose and eyes – but mouth ulcers may also occur.  Once infected a cat may carry the virus for a long time and pose a risk to any unvaccinated cat it meets.  Cats carrying the virus may not have any symptoms or may have mouth ulcers or ‘snotty noses’ which never get better.  The protection given by vaccination may be short-lived and sometimes your cat may need to be vaccinated at six-month intervals.

Feline Leukaemia (FeLV)
Feline Leukaemia is probably the most important viral disease in cats.  Not all cats that are infected with the virus get the disease.  But, in those that do, it is almost always fatal and treatment can only prolong the cat’s life.  The disease destroys the cat’s defences against other diseases and may cause fatal cancers.  The virus is spread by direct contact with other cats so any cat that goes outside or mixes with other cats is at risk. If your cat is diagnosed with Feline Leukaemia it is recommended that they become house cats now as to prevent spreading the disease any further. 

Chlamydia
Chlamydia is a disease which causes painful inflammation (conjunctivitis), ulcers and discharge from the eyes.  It may cause infertility in some female cats.  Young kittens with the disease may have sore or runny eyes from a few weeks old.  It is mainly a problem where a large number of cats live together and once a cattery is affected, the disease often keeps coming back.  Cats living on their own are at low risk of catching the disease.  The disease can be treated with a long course of antibiotics.

What vaccinations are there for my dog?

Canine Distemper (Hard pad)
Canine Distemper is a serious disease of dogs caused by a virus.  Affected dogs are often very ill and many die from the disease.  Symptoms include coughing, a snotty nose, vomiting, diarrhoea and convulsions.  Animals which recover may have ongoing illnesses for the rest of their lives.  The vaccine is very effective and if given every 2-3 years will produce full protection against the disease.
Canine Infectious Hepatitis (adenovirus 1)
Canine infectious hepatitis is a disease caused by a virus which attacks the liver and can cause liver failure.  Many animals who succumb to this disease will die.  Less severely affected dogs may have a cough and a high temperature and may also develop a white layer on the front of the eye.  There is no specific treatment for the disease but vaccination gives good protection.

Canine Parvovirus (Parvo)
Canine parvovirus is a virus which causes severe vomiting and diarrhoea, usually in young puppies.  Many puppies affected by the disease will die.  The disease is often less severe in older dogs but if bitches are infected while they are pregnant the puppies may be born with deformities.

Leptospirosis (Weil’s disease)
Leptospirosis is an infection caused by a bacterium.  The disease is usually spread by rats which pass the bacteria out in their urine.  The bacteria only survive well in moist conditions outside the rat, so dogs which spend a lot of time I water are most at risk.  The disease is very serious and can cause jaundice and liver failure and can be spread to people as well as infecting dogs.  Vaccination gives very good protection and usually lasts for a year (although dogs at high risk may need to be vaccinated more often).

Kennel Cough (infectious tracheobronchitis)
Kennel cough is not a serious disease in most otherwise healthy dogs.  However, it is very infectious and will rapidly spread around the dog population.  As its name suggests, it causes coughing which can go on for a month in some cases.  Good kennels will insist that your dog is vaccinated against the disease before agreeing to take them for boarding.  Kennel cough is caused by a combination of viruses and bacteria including: Canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus 2 and Bordetella. 

WHY

Why vaccinate my dog?
Vaccinations can help protect your dog against some potentially fatal diseases, such as parvovirus, canine distemper, leptospirosis and infectious canine hepatitis.
Vaccinating your dog also stops them from catching and spreading deadly diseases to other dogs. Vaccinated dogs are less likely to catch diseases and won’t spread them around – meaning the whole of the dog population is also a little safer!

Why vaccinate my cat?

Cat vaccinations help to protect your pets from severe infectious diseases such as Feline Leukaemia, Feline viral rhinotracheitis and Feline Chlamydia. It also prevents them from passing anything nasty on to other cats in the area. 

If you would like to discuss vaccinations with us please feel free to call us at the surgery on 02087641254. 👍🐱🐶💉Image attachmentImage attachment

The most unforgettable Hudson came in to visit us on a couple of occasions this week for Blood tests and a Dental descale and polish, then again yesterday to have his Blood Pressure measured. It wasn't only his good behavior that grabbed our attention but also his trade mark tongue poking out to say hello! Isn't he just the cutest thing! ... See MoreSee Less

The most unforgettable Hudson came in to visit us on a couple of occasions this week for Blood tests and a Dental descale and polish, then again yesterday to have his Blood Pressure measured. It wasnt only his good behavior that grabbed our attention but also his trade mark tongue poking out to say hello! Isnt he just the cutest thing!Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

He’s gorgeous! 😍

You sure he was sticking his tongue out to say hello (or was you taking he’s temperature) x

Vaccination Amnesty Month,Spread the word!

It is very important to maintain your pets from disease with regular booster vaccinations.

During the whole of April we are offering all our clients fur babies who have missed their yearly booster vaccinations to be able to restart their primary course of injections at a reduce cost!

Please call the surgery on 0208 764 1254 to book an appointment for your pet.

This offer to restart your pets vaccinations is not only for existing clients but new too
... See MoreSee Less

Vaccination Amnesty Month,Spread the word! 

It is very important to maintain your pets from disease with regular booster vaccinations. 

During the whole of April we are offering all our clients fur babies who have missed their yearly booster vaccinations to be able to restart their primary course of injections at a reduce cost!

Please call the surgery on 0208 764 1254 to book an appointment for your pet. 

This offer to restart your pets vaccinations is not only for existing clients but new tooImage attachmentImage attachment

3 weeks ago

Norbury Pet Health Centre

Who else has that Friday feeling like this champion Cat! We've made it!
We hope you all have a lovely weekend 😁👍😹

Pet Humor
www.PetHumor.com
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Comment on Facebook

Boxing cat!! 😂

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T: 0208 764 1254

A: 1203A London Road
Norbury
London
SW16 4UY

E: info@nphc.co.uk

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